Drought Effects Corn and Soy Crops

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The drought that occurred recently in the northern plains of the USA can be a cause of concern for the farming of corn and soy crops. The region is prominent as the wheat-growing region, however, the area is also known for the high increase in producing corn and soybean. The drought may disappoint the expectations of the record sales of corn and soybean harvests in the USA. As the temperature in the North Dakota and South Dakota regions goes high and there is an increase in the dryness, then the dry weather continues will be a hurdle for the production of corn and soy crops. Using Modern Agricultural Equipment can give relief only if the climatic conditions improve and the temperature lowers.

Even though it is not clear to state about the conditions of drought when you are in the month of April, the dry weather conditions can prove to be a cause of concern for the production of corn and soy crops.

On average, the two states i.e. North Dakota and South Dakota grow about 7.5% of the U.S. corn crop and approximately 10% of U.S. soybeans every year. That accounts for a large share and the unfavourable weather conditions can lower or affect the national production of corn and soy crops in the USA. Usually, during the normal weather conditions and yields, U.S. corn and soybean crops amount to the second-largest in the world at large on record. However, because of the weather conditions, there is difficulty to fulfill the growing demand from exporters, processors, livestock feeders, and biofuel makers.

In case all of North Dakota and about 78% of parts of South Dakota face the condition of drought, with conditions rated from moderate to extreme drought on the four-point drought scale then the production of the top corn state may hit on a large scale. Northern Iowa and many parts of Minnesota that produce corn can face abnormally dry conditions. Also, most of the Western parts are covered by drought ranging from the Northern Plains to the Rocky Mountain states, which are going to add to the loss of harvest due to dry weather.

The planting season of corn and soy

The planting season of corn and soy in its early weeks and harvest is still months away. Therefore, there is enough time for the dry weather conditions to improve. The summer months are usually considered a make or break period for the planting of corn and soybean crops.

Although, this year,  4% of U.S. corn land was planted during the festive season of Easter. It is not a time for wheat planting, and sowing of spring wheat is still ahead of average using the Agriculture Equipment for sale.

North Dakota was known as the largest wheat-growing state for the past three years and is one of the dominating states in the production of durum wheat. This quality of durum wheat is used widely in making pasta. But there will be more planting of soybeans amounting to  7 million acres, and wheat 6.4 million acres this year.

In South Dakota farmers will plant about 5.6 million acres of corn along with an estimated 5.7 million acres of soybeans using Modern Agricultural Equipment, as compared with 1.5 million acres of wheat that are estimated for planting this year.

The rise in the prices of the commodities will encourage growers to increase plantings this year. Farmers expect to plant nearly 252 million acres of the eight major field crops — corn, soybeans, wheat, cotton, sorghum, barley, oats, and rice by employing Agriculture Equipment for sale.

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